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Illegal Gambling, Drugs, Death at Horse Track Probable, PETA Warns Sheriff

Doping, Electroshock Devices, Death Likely at Unsanctioned Memphis Horse Race; PETA Urges Sheriff to Investigate

For Immediate Release:
August 10, 2022

Contact:
David Perle 202-483-7382

Memphis, Tenn. – Shelby County’s sheriff has been told to look out for illegal gambling as well as horses being injected with methamphetamines and cocaine, electroshocked, or subjected to other acts of cruelty this weekend, when underground horse races at Carril El Gringo are scheduled to take place. PETA’s 10-month video investigation into similar unregulated match races in Georgia—which The Washington Post broke just days ago—revealed widespread doping with street drugs, the use of electric shock devices, fatal horse injuries, betting, and more, all in apparent violation of law. PETA rushed a letter to Shelby County Sheriff Floyd Bonner Jr. today, calling on him to investigate the black market track.

Some characters exposed in PETA’s investigation have indicated on social media that they will be at Carril El Gringo on Sunday, including the Quarter Horse stable Cuadra Rancho El Diamante. This stable’s horse El Borrego died of a “heart attack” in a race PETA filmed in Georgia, and at least two more of its horses died at the track in 2020 and 2021. Another stable, Cuadra Buena Vista, whose worker is shown in a Facebook video (beginning at 1:29) with a red liquid-filled syringe, is also planning to attend.

“Black market horse racing is a cesspool of greed, drugs, and abuse and an indictment of the area it gets away with operating in,” says PETA Senior Vice President Kathy Guillermo. “Officials must not look the other way when they’re charged with upholding the law, including the law against cruelty to animals.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment”—opposes speciesism, a human-supremacist worldview. For more information on PETA’s investigative newsgathering and reporting, please visit PETA.org or follow the group on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

PETA’s letter to Bonner follows.

August 10, 2022

The Honorable Floyd Bonner Jr.

Shelby County Sheriff

Shelby County Sheriff’s Office

Dear Sheriff Bonner:

I’m writing on behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals U.S.—PETA entities have more than 9 million members and supporters globally—to request that you investigate an apparent championship underground horse race that is scheduled to take place at Carril El Gringo, also known as Carril De Memphis (3370 Benjestown Rd., Memphis, TN 38127), on August 14.

PETA just released the results of a 10-month investigation into underground Quarter Horse racing, exposing widespread doping with substances including methamphetamine, cocaine, and Ritalin; the use of electric shock devices; fatal horse injuries; jockey injuries and death; and hundreds of thousands of dollars in apparently illegal gambling at Rancho El Centenario, the largest black market track, or “bush track,” in Georgia. PETA has now filed complaints with state and local authorities calling for criminal investigations into these and other acts that appear to violate numerous laws. Our video footage available here and photographs available here could indicate what may occur at 3370 Benjestown Rd.

There are connections between the unsanctioned races in Georgia and the races planned in Memphis. The Quarter Horse stable Cuadra Rancho El Diamante has scheduled a race at Carril El Gringo on Sunday. This stable’s horse El Borrego died of an alleged heart attack in a race that PETA filmed at Rancho El Centenario, and at least two of its horses died at the track in 2020 and 2021. Another stable, Cuadra Buena Vista, is also anticipated to be in attendance on Sunday. A Facebook video from Rancho El Canelo in Dalton, Georgia, the other track that PETA investigated, shows a worker from this stable with a syringe filled with a red liquid. You can watch the video here at 1:29.

We urge you to investigate and take all appropriate action to prevent violations of Tennessee’s anti-cruelty, gambling, and drug laws.

Thank you for your time and consideration. May I please hear from you?

Sincerely,

Kathy Guillermo

Senior Vice President

Equine Matters Department




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Putin Gets Petitions From Russian Artists, Scientists To Halt Death Penalty In Ukraine’s Donetsk: ‘Mercy Is The Strength Of Our People’

Russian scientists and human rights activists are asking President Vladimir Putin to halt Russia’s death penalty in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic (DNR).

A petition started by Russian mathematician Alexander Bufetov on Change.org, addressed to Putin, read, “Mr. President! Vladimir Vladimirovich! We are very concerned about reports of the possibly imminent execution of death sentences handed down in the Donetsk People’s Republic.”

The petition signed by film director Alexander Sokurov, journalist Eva Merkacheva and physicist Nikolai Rozanov asked Putin to “suggest” a legal change to DNR leader Denis Pushilin.

See Also: Ukraine National Anthem Echoes In India As Grandmaster Anna Ushenina Bags Gold: ‘Not Very Clear If I Will Be Able To Go Back Home’

This came after a DNR local court in June sentenced two British citizens, Aiden Aslin and Shaun Pinner, and a Moroccan national, Saadun Brahim, — who fought with Russia alongside Ukrainian forces — to death on charges of “mercenary activity” and attempted “forcible seizure of power.”

“I really think that the death penalty in the territory where Slavic peoples live, in the space where Christianity works, is generally unacceptable,” film director Sokurov told RBC Russia.

“Mercy is the strength of our [Russian] people. We ask you for mercy. We consider it necessary to abolish the death penalty in the Donetsk People’s Republic,” the petitioners wrote.

Meanwhile, heavy fighting raged around the eastern Ukrainian town of Pisky on Thursday, according to Reuters. An official with the Russia-backed Donetsk People’s Republic told the publication that Pisky was under the control of Russian and separatist forces.

Check out more of Benzinga’s Europe and Asia coverage by following this link.


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Women on vegetarian diet have higher risk of hip fracture compared to regular meat-eaters

A study of over 26,000 middle-aged UK women reveals those with a vegetarian diet had a 33% higher risk of hip fracture compared to regular meat-eaters.

University of Leeds research, published today (Thursday, August 11) in the journal BMC Medicine, investigated the risk of hip fracture in occasional meat-eaters; pescatarians, people who eat fish but not meat; and vegetarians compared to regular meat-eaters.

Among 26,318 women, 822 hip fracture cases were observed over roughly 20 years – that represented just over 3% of the sample population. After adjustment for factors such as smoking and age, vegetarians were the only diet group with an elevated risk of hip fracture.

This study is one of very few studies to compare risk of hip fracture in vegetarians and meat-eaters where the occurrence of hip fracture was confirmed from hospital records.

The scientists stress the need for more research into the exact causes of why vegetarians were at a greater risk of hip fracture.

Vegetarian diets can be ‘healthy or unhealthy’

Study lead author James Webster, a doctoral researcher from the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds, said: “Our study highlights potential concerns regarding risk of hip fracture in women who have a vegetarian diet. However, it is not warning people to abandon vegetarian diets. As with any diet, it is important to understand personal circumstances and what nutrients are needed for a balanced healthy lifestyle.

“Vegetarian diets can vary widely from person to person and can be healthy or unhealthy, just like diets that include animal products.

“However, it is concerning that vegetarian diets often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health. These types of nutrients generally are more abundant in meat and other animal products than in plants, such as protein, calcium, and other micronutrients.

“Low intake of these nutrients can lead to lower bone mineral density and muscle mass, which can make you more susceptible to hip fracture risk. This makes it especially important for further research to better understand factors driving the increased risk in vegetarians, whether it be particular nutrient deficiencies or weight management, so that we can help people to make healthy choices.”

Plant-based diets growing in popularity

Vegetarian diets have gained popularity in recent years, with a 2021 YouGov survey putting the size of the UK vegetarian population at roughly 5-7%. It is often perceived as a healthier dietary option, with previous evidence that shows a vegetarian diet can reduce the risks of several chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer compared to omnivorous diets.

There is also a worldwide call for reducing the consumption of animal products in an effort to tackle climate change.

Understanding hip fracture risk in vegetarians is therefore becoming increasingly important to public health.

Study co-author Professor Janet Cade, leader of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group in the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds, said: “Hip fracture is a global health issue with high economic costs that causes loss of independence, reduces quality of life, and increases risk of other health issues.

Plant-based diets have been linked with poor bone health, but there has been a lack of evidence on the links to hip fracture risk. This study is an important step in understanding the potential risk plant-based diets could present over the long-term and what can be done to mitigate those risks.”


Professor Janet Cade, study co-author, leader of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group, School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds

The team used data from the UK Women’s Cohort Study to investigate possible links between diet and hip fracture risk. The national cohort of middle-aged women was established at the University of Leeds to explore links between diet and chronic disease, encompassing a wide range of different eating patterns. Dietary information was collected using a food frequency questionnaire and was validated using a 4-day food diary in a subsample of women.

At the time they were recruited into the cohort study, the women ranged in age from 35 to 69 years.

Effect of low BMI

The research team found that the average BMI among vegetarians was slightly lower than the average among the regular meat eaters. Previous research has shown a link between low BMI and a high risk of hip fracture.

Lower BMI can indicate people are underweight, which can mean poorer bone and muscle health, and higher risk of hip fracture. Further investigation is needed to determine if low BMI is the reason for the observed higher risk in vegetarians.

Study co-author, Dr Darren Greenwood, a biostatistician in the School of Medicine at Leeds, said: “This study is just part of the wider picture of diet and healthy bones and muscles in older age.

“Further research is needed to confirm whether there could be similar results in men, to explore the role of body weight, and to identify the reasons for different outcomes in vegetarians and meat-eaters.”

Source:

Journal reference:

Webster, J., et al. (2022) Risk of hip fracture in meat-eaters, pescatarians, and vegetarians: results from the UK Women’s Cohort Study. BMC Medicine. doi.org/10.1186/s12916-022-02468-0.


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I’m a size 22 & love wearing tiny bikinis in heatwaves – trolls say I’m too fat & call me whale but I’m proud of my body

POSING happily and flaunting her curves in a white string bikini, size 22 Adele Hobkinson is determined to defy the cruel trolls who regularly taunt her and tell her to cover up.

The former customer service worker, 40, who weighs over 18st, says she’s proud to be plus size, feeling her sexiest when wearing skimpy swimwear and mini skirts, which help her keep cool while looking hot.

Mum of three Adele is proud to flaunt her curves and loves nothing more than wearing a sexy string bikini

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Mum of three Adele is proud to flaunt her curves and loves nothing more than wearing a sexy string bikiniCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

Sadly, the abuse 5ft 5in Adele – who has a BMI of 45 which makes her ‘clinically obese’ – receives is constant, with critics branding her “disgusting” and a “whale”.

However the mum-of-three from Nottingham wants to share her story to encourage others to ignore the haters and feel confident about their own bodies.

Adele says: “I’ve reclaimed the word ‘fat’, and am so proud of my curves, so why wouldn’t I show them off?

“I receive so much hate, but so much love too – women message to say I’m a role model, and I’ve had marriage requests from men all over the world!

I'm plus size and proud- I've been trolled but love my curves & enter pageants
I retired at 43- it shocks people but it IS possible & here's how I did it
The former customer service worker hasn't always felt so confident

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The former customer service worker hasn’t always felt so confidentCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

“My body has produced three amazing kids, and I want to show you don’t have to be a size zero or a Love Island wannabe to look fab and feel confident.”

‘I was called Mrs Blobby and fatso’

Despite her positivity now, Adele hasn’t always been so body confident, having been bullied from the age of five.

She says: “I’ve always been a big girl, I would comfort eat chocolate and sweets. By the time I was 12 I was a size 14.

“At 16 I was wearing size 18 clothes, and I was constantly called cruel names like Mrs Blobby and Fatso.

“I was teased mercilessly. I’d cry all the time and I felt left out and unwanted.

“At my lowest ebb I hated myself, and my body, and believed the bullies.

“I tried every weightloss plan, from the cabbage soup diet to eating only red or green foods. Nothing worked and it really impacted my confidence.

“It got to the point where I didn’t think I could ever love my body or find a fella.”

New found confidence

Adele now doesn't feel the need to cover up her body, and wants to encourage others to do the same

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Adele now doesn’t feel the need to cover up her body, and wants to encourage others to do the sameCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

However in December 2003, aged 22, Adele met her partner of 19 years, retired aerial installer Tom, now 52.

Adele says: “At that point I was over 20st and a size 26, and I covered up my hated body with baggy tent dresses.

“However, Tom showered me with compliments and told me he loved me for who I was. 

“It gave me the confidence to love my body.”

Finally feeling sexy

In April 2007, Adele and Tom welcomed their first son, now 15.

Their second son, 13, came along in November 2008 and their daughter, nine, was born in December 2012.

Adele says: “During each pregnancy I gained weight and found it incredibly hard to lose, so I decided I needed to change the way I thought about my body and embrace my curves.

“Tom was constantly telling me I was sexy and glamorous so I started to embrace my curves and began shopping in Primark, BooHoo and Asda for short skirts and low cut, stretchy tops to show off my 42C chest.

“It was at a time when shops weren’t selling as many plus size fashion options as there are today, so it wasn’t easy.”

Cruel taunts

The mum has over quarter of a million social media fans

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The mum has over quarter of a million social media fansCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

In 2010, aged 28, Adele started sharing her body confidence journey on YouTube, and later set up her own Instagram and TikTok, accumulating 350,000 fans and followers.

However while Adele had found confidence, cruel trolls weren’t so thrilled by her outfit choices and she started to get horrible looks and comments, both online and in person.

She says: “The first cruel taunt was in July 2014 when I was online wearing a red low-cut top and and black mini skirt. 

“Someone wrote, ‘you look like a Beluga whale, cover up’. At first I was shocked and mortified.

“It bothered me that someone would take the time to type such a hurtful remark on a public forum when they could have just looked at something else.

“Then I realised I was better than that and I should ignore the trolls because they eventually get bored. I feel sorry for them.”

‘I’ve been called a whale’

The social media star is determined to promote body positivity and receives compliments as well as criticism

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The social media star is determined to promote body positivity and receives compliments as well as criticismCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

Now Adele is used to the abuse, especially after going viral in April this year.

She says: “I uploaded a video of myself wearing a white string bikini slapping my belly and said, ‘This is a bikini body. I am ready to go and p*** some people off at the beach.’

“I was stunned when the video got more than 4.6million views in just a few days.

“Quickly, the abuse rolled in. ‘Early grave,’ typed one keyboard warrior. Others said I was a ‘whale’, ‘disgusting’ and said I needed to cover up.”

‘Fat fan club’

Adele says the abuse makes her laugh and she feels sorry for trolls

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Adele says the abuse makes her laugh and she feels sorry for trollsCredit: @ADELESEXYUK

Thankfully, Adele’s confidence has won her legions of fans, too.

She says: “The abuse makes me laugh and I don’t care.

“I have over a quarter of a million social media followers from all over the world who cannot get enough of my big, beautiful body.

“Plus-size women who hide their bodies because they fear being abused congratulate me on my confidence, and I receive lots of compliments thanking me.

“My inbox is full of thousands of other messages of love, and I also have male admirers from around the world asking me to marry them, and tell me I am a ‘hot mumma’.

“Others have pleaded for me to set up an OnlyFans page so they can see me pose nude. I haven’t done it, but it’s really flattering.

“I will not be told what to do or what to wear by gutless trolls. I am not frightened of flaunting my flab and showing off my fat – it is my body and I am proud.”

Adele posing proudly in a skimpy bikini

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Adele posing proudly in a skimpy bikiniCredit: @ADELESEXYUK
Adele says she won't let nasty people stop her celebrating her body

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Adele says she won’t let nasty people stop her celebrating her bodyCredit: @ADELESEXYUK




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Wildlife sightings cause excitement on Northumberland Wildlife Trust’s East Chevington nature reserve

As part of the Catch My Drift project, five volunteers spent three days surveying the 185-hectare East Chevington reserve for butterflies, with one volunteer having spotted a rare purple hairstreak butterfly next to one of the reserve’s footpaths.

The butterfly relies entirely on the oak tree to survive, using it as a food source, home and place to lay eggs.

It is mostly found in oak woods across southern England and Wales, with scattered colonies further north, but are not massively recorded in this region.

A male emperor dragonfly sits atop a blade of grass. Picture: Dave Purnell

The reserve has semi mature oak trees, so the reserve says that it [the butterfly] is likely living in one of them.

On the same day, an emperor dragonfly, previously unrecorded on the East Chevington reserve, was spotted and photographed by a member of the public named Dave Purnell.

This breed of dragonfly is described as a ‘great colonizer of ponds’, and was found in a pond created by Catch My Drift project volunteers.

Additionally, at Druridge Bay, a pair of juvenile tawny owls were spotted perching in the woodland trees on the wildlife charity’s Hauxley reserve.

A tawny owl perches on the branch of tree.

However, a red squirrel moved itself into the tawny owl nest boxes at the end of April and reportedly barricaded the doorway with sticks to stop the owl from getting back in.

This had led to staff on the reserve ‘resigning’ themselves to the prospect of young Tawny owls not appearing once again this year.

However, their hopes were once again lifted when adult owls found somewhere else to breed on the reserve.

Tawny owls are said to prefer more mature trees, so it is hoped that as the reserve’s woodland starts to mature, they will become a regular sighting.

Alex Lister, Northumberland Wildlife Trust’s Druridge Bay landscape manager, said: “From a squirrel taking over a nest box and another taking a look inside the building in the morning to tawny owls taking over the playground, turf wars with crows and now a rare butterfly and dragonfly being found at East Chevington, who says wildlife isn’t great?

“Access to our reserves if free, so if you’re watching your cash this summer, come and see what you can spot for yourself.”


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Vegetarian women ‘more likely to break hips in later life’ study says

New research has suggested that women who follow a vegetarian diet have a higher risk of breaking their hips in later life.

Researchers said vegetarian diets “often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health” after their study found female vegetarians had a 33% increased risk of hip fracture compared to regular meat eaters.

The study, which involved more than 26,000 women aged 35-69 from across the UK, assessed the risk of hip fracture among vegetarians, pescatarians – those who eat fish but not meat – and occasional meat eaters compared with regular meat eaters.

After around 20 years, researchers noted 822 hip fractures among the women – around 3% of those involved in the study, which has been published in the journal BMC Medicine.

Herald Series: The research involved more than 26,000 women (Canva)The research involved more than 26,000 women (Canva)

Experts from the University of Leeds found that an elevated risk of hip fracture was found only among vegetarian women compared with women who regularly consumed meat.

The data was drawn from the UK Women’s Cohort Study, which is tracking women over time to assess the risks between diet and health.

Study lead author James Webster, a researcher from the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds, clarified that the findings were not a call for people to abandon being vegetarian.

He said: “Our study highlights potential concerns regarding risk of hip fracture in vegetarian women.

“However, it is not warning people to abandon vegetarian diets – as with any diet, it is important to understand personal circumstances and what nutrients are needed for a balanced healthy lifestyle.”

Vegetarian diets often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health. These types of nutrients generally are more abundant in meat and other animal products than in plants, such as protein, calcium, and other micronutrients.

“Low intake of these nutrients can lead to lower bone mineral density and muscle mass, which can make you more susceptible to hip fracture risk.”

Researchers said further study is needed to assess whether there could be similar results found among men.




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Women on vegetarian diets more likely to break their hips, study finds | UK News

Women who follow a vegetarian diet are more likely to break their hips later in life, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Leeds found female vegetarians see their risk of hip fracture increase by 33% compared to those who eat meat.

They said a possible reason for this could be vegetarian diets “often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health”.

More than 26,000 women aged 35-69 from across the UK took part in the study.

It assessed the risk of hip fracture among vegetarians, pescatarians – those who eat fish but not meat – and occasional meat eaters compared with regular meat eaters.

After around 20 years, researchers noted 822 hip fractures among the women – around 3% – and that an elevated risk of hip fracture was only among female vegetarians compared with women who regularly consumed meat.

The data was drawn from the UK Women’s Cohort Study, which is tracking women over time to assess the risks between diet and health.

Among the group of women 28% are vegetarian and 1% are vegan.

Study lead author James Webster said: “Our study highlights potential concerns regarding risk of hip fracture in vegetarian women.

“However, it is not warning people to abandon vegetarian diets – as with any diet, it is important to understand personal circumstances and what nutrients are needed for a balanced healthy lifestyle.”

He added: “Vegetarian diets often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health. These types of nutrients generally are more abundant in meat and other animal products than in plants, such as protein, calcium, and other micronutrients.

“Low intake of these nutrients can lead to lower bone mineral density and muscle mass, which can make you more susceptible to hip fracture risk.”

Researchers said further research is needed to assess whether there could be similar results found among men.

The study has been published in the journal BMC Medicine.


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Vegetarian women are a THIRD more likely to suffer hip fractures

Vegetarian women are a THIRD more likely to suffer hip fractures later in life because ‘they don’t get enough nutrients to keep bones strong’

  • Leeds University researchers studied more than 26,000 middle-aged women
  • Those who did not eat meat and fish had 33 per cent higher risk of hip fractures
  • Reinforces advice vegetarians should fortify diets with key nutrient supplements

Vegetarian women have a higher risk of breaking their hips in later life compared to meat-eaters, research suggests.

A study of more than 26,000 middle-aged women has revealed those who do not eat meat and fish have a 33 per cent higher risk of hip fractures.

This could be because they have a lower intake of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health, the researchers said.

And it reinforces advice that vegetarians should fortify their diets with key nutrients, they added.

A team from Leeds University investigated the risk of hip fracture in occasional meat-eaters, pescatarians – who eat fish but not meat – and vegetarians compared to regular meat-eaters.

Vegetarian women have a higher risk of breaking their hips in later life compared to meat-eaters, research suggests

Vegetarian women have a higher risk of breaking their hips in later life compared to meat-eaters, research suggests 

Downsides of giving up meat

Switching to a completely plant-based diet could leave you tired or breaking out in acne, dieticians have warned.  

Not eating or drinking animal products could leave you missing out on key vitamins like B12 as well as proteins. 

A lack of vitamin B12, which is in found milk and eggs, can lead to fatigue or tiredness and negatively impact your mental health. 

Vitamin D is another nutrient found mainly in animal products, like oily fish, that those on vegan diets can be deficient in.

A vitamin D deficiency can lead to issues with bone development and cause pain. 

Not getting enough protein, which we get from dairy products, fish, eggs and meat can stunt growth in children and also lead to acne breakouts.

A lack of iron, found in red meat and liver, can lead to anaemia, causing people to feel tired and have heart palpitations.

Iodine, mainly found in seafood, is another nutrient known to be lacking in vegan diets and is important in maintaining a health metabolism. 

Plant-based diets can include all of these mentioned nutrients but people need to carefully manage what they eat, or take supplements, to ensure they get enough. 

This is especially true if people are switching to a vegan diet after primarily getting these nutrients from animal products.   

But another risk is the false perception that vegan products are inherently healthier than non-vegan options.

A MailOnline analysis of meat-free vegan alternative foods found a significant number contained more salt, sugar and fat than the product they were meant to replace. 

Among 26,318 women, 822 hip fracture cases were observed over roughly 20 years – meaning around 3 per cent of women experienced them.

Analysis, published in the journal BMC Medicine, found that after adjusting for factors such as smoking and age, vegetarians were the only diet group with an elevated risk of hip fracture.

The team also discovered the average BMI among vegetarians was slightly lower than the average among the regular meat eaters.

Previous research has shown a link between low BMI and high risk of hip fracture, which could help explain the finding.

Lead author James Webster said vegetarian diets can vary, with some still being unhealthy.

‘Our study highlights potential concerns regarding risk of hip fracture in women who have a vegetarian diet,’ he said.

‘However, it is not warning people to abandon vegetarian diets. As with any diet, it is important to understand personal circumstances and what nutrients are needed for a balanced healthy lifestyle.

‘Vegetarian diets can vary widely from person to person and can be healthy or unhealthy, just like diets that include animal products.

‘However, it is concerning that vegetarian diets often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health. These types of nutrients generally are more abundant in meat and other animal products than in plants, such as protein, calcium, and other micronutrients.

‘Low intake of these nutrients can lead to lower bone mineral density and muscle mass, which can make you more susceptible to hip fracture risk.’

Vegetarian diets have gained popularity in recent years, with a 2021 survey putting the size of the UK vegetarian population as high as 7 per cent.

It is often perceived as a healthier dietary option, with previous evidence showing it can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer compared to people who also eat meat.

However it has also been linked to negative effects such as poor bone health.

Co-author Professor Janet Cade said: ‘Hip fracture is a global health issue with high economic costs that causes loss of independence, reduces quality of life, and increases risk of other health issues.

‘Plant-based diets have been linked with poor bone health, but there has been a lack of evidence on the links to hip fracture risk.

‘This study is an important step in understanding the potential risk plant-based diets could present over the long-term and what can be done to mitigate those risks.’

Not being underweight, fortifying the diet with key nutrients and being physically active to strengthen bones and muscles are some of the ways vegetarian women can help maintain their bone health, the authors said.

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