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Park Eun-bin from Netflix Series, Extraordinary Attorney Woo, Elephants Beaten and Chained for Shrine Circuses & Sustainable Action Now Highlights Recent Protests!

Check out the highlights from some of our recent actions:

We hope you’ll join us at the next protest near you!

If you are you someone who is passionate about fighting for animal rights and if you want to make a difference to create change in the world, look for a protest near you.

Whether you are a seasoned activist who has been protesting for years or someone who is just starting out and has never attended a protest, we want to extend a warm invitation to you to join us in the fight for animal rights.

We believe that everyone has a role to play in creating a better world, and that no matter where you come from or what your background is, you can make a difference.

Our movement is inclusive and welcoming, and we strive to create a space for people of all walks of life to come together and work towards a common goal. So whether you are a student, a parent, a professional, or anything in between, we hope that you will join us and be a part of this important work.

Let’s stand together and fight for a better future for all beings.

Here are some highlights from some of the more recents protests:

The new hit series on Netflix from South Korea, Extraordinary Attorney Woo, is attracting international attention. For those of you who are not familiar with the show, it features a young woman, Park Eun-bin, who is an attorney starting her first job in South Korea and who happens to be autistic. Rotten Tomatoes rates the show 100% for critics’ endorsement.

But the big surprise of the show is that Attorney Woo is a passionate lover of whales and dolphins. While the show is not expressly about whales and dolphins, they appear here and there in every episode as her psychic muses. Attorney Woo herself is a passionate opponent of captivity and the killing of dolphins and whales.

Capitalizing on the stunning popularity of the series, the International Marine Mammal Project’s (IMMP’s) office in the Philippines came up with the ingenious idea to feature a look-alike Attorney Woo as part of their demonstration against the Taiji dolphin hunts on September 1st. The demonstration garnered wide media attention in the Philippines, and appeared in news stories in Japan Today and the Global Mirror.

PETA supporters with heavy chains blocked the entrance to the Yaarab Shrine Circus, which continues to exploit elephants and other animals, on its opening day. Padlocked together to the chains, activists prevented anyone from entering the circus grounds. PETA is asking Shrine circuses to end all animal acts.

The world’s largest Starbucks location closed temporarily after several PETA supporters wearing cow masks sat down and demanded that the coffee chain stop charging extra for vegan milks. Would-be customers were offered a free vegan latte instead.

Just before Easter, PETA’s thought-provoking baby barbecues in Charleston, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; and Jacksonville, Florida, reminded everyone that animals are just babies when they’re slaughtered and that there’s no real difference between them and human babies. We asked everyone to keep all babies off the grill this Easter holiday and every day by going vegan.

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. 

PETA continued to push forward with its campaign against Budweiser, the King of Tears, to urge the beer company to stop mutilating Clydesdales by cutting off their tailbones. PETA supporters crashed Budweiser’s 90th anniversary party in St. Louis and protested at other Clydesdale appearances throughout the U.S.

PETA supporters continue to pressure Whole Foods to stop enabling the rampant abuse of the Thai coconut milk industry, which uses cruel forced monkey labor. PETA “monkeys” have been seen dumping hundreds of humanely picked coconuts and smashing them in protest outside Whole Foods stores in Austin, Texas; Denver, Colorado; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Washington, D.C.

Whole Foods closed its D.C. location for several hours after protesters entered the store and held a sit-in on top of the checkout counters.

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Ohio and the Death Penalty, Dolphin Hunting, Capturing & Killing Season Begins, Harvard University, EGYPTAIR, Running with the Bulls!

If It's September, it is the start of the Dolphin Hunting, Killing & Captivity Season in Taiji, Japan!

It stirs up a feeling of sadness and empathy within me to think about how Angel, the albino dolphin, was taken away from the peaceful waters of the cove in Taiji, Japan so many years ago. The thought of Angel living in a tank for all these years, with limited space to swim and explore, breaks my heart. I can only imagine the toll that such confinement can take on a creature that was meant to roam free in the vast expanses of the ocean. It’s a sobering reminder of the consequences that human actions can have on the natural world. I can only hope that Angel is being well-cared for, receiving the best possible treatment and care, and that someday, maybe, she will be able to return to the ocean and be reunited with her pod.

On the first day of September every year, the Taiji dolphin slaughter begins. For six months, dolphin-hunting vessels sail out of Taiji, Japan; hunt down pods of wild dolphins; surround them; and drive them back toward land to the infamous killing cove.

Taiji Dolphin Slaughter and Capture

Once in the cove, dolphin hunters snare the animals with nets and drag them to shore for the selection process. Dolphin trainers work with the hunters to choose the youngest and most attractive—the ones who will be sold to marine parks and “swim with dolphins” encounters. Pod members try to fight them off and protect one another, but their efforts are in vain. The mother was unable to save her baby.

Those who aren’t chosen also face a cruel fate. Hunters—and sometimes even trainers—kill them by hammering metal rods into their spinal cords just below the blowhole. They then remove the rods and replace them with corks to keep the water in the killing cove from turning bright red. Dolphins die slowly and painfully of hemorrhaging or suffocation while watching their family members and podmates die around them. Their flesh is then sold as meat.

Taiji Dolphin Slaughter and Capture

This deadly spectacle takes place only because tourists want to pet dolphins and take pictures with them.

The captive-dolphin industry directly funds the Taiji dolphin slaughter. A single dolphin can sell for as much as $152,000. Even in countries that no longer allow the importation of dolphins caught during the gruesome slaughter, marine parks and “swim with dolphins” facilities can still display animals purchased before the ban. Animals can also be moved through other countries to disguise their origin. And exhibitors that claim not to purchase from Taiji often still have hidden connections to the slaughter.

When humans stop paying to see suffering dolphins performing stupid tricks, swimming in circles in cramped tanks, or hauling tourists around on their dorsal fins, the slaughter will no longer be profitable.

man riding sad dolphin face blurred

Dolphins deserve better.

Dolphins’ brains are much larger than those of humans. (Many would argue their hearts are, too.) These brilliant animals use complex echolocation to navigate the vast ocean, swimming up to 60 miles a day. They have highly developed communication skills, and it’s believed that individuals respond to the sound of a signature whistle the same way humans respond to the sound of their names. Forcing these emotionally complex animals to live in tanks for our entertainment is morally bankrupt.

Let’s end the dolphin slaughter.

What You Can Do

Ohio just moved one step closer to ending the death penalty!

Last Wednesday, Demetrius Minor, the National Manager of CCATDP,  had the opportunity to join the #NoDeathPenaltyOH campaign at the Ohio Statehouse for a press conference announcing the introduction of the House bill to end the death penalty!

The House bill will serve as a companion to SB 101, which is already moving in the Senate. This bill is yet another sign that momentum is on our side, but we still have more work to do to cross the finish line.
Thank the Bill Sponsors

As Ohio reckons with other life issues this fall, Republican leaders recognize that the death penalty is part of that conversation. It’s time to end this costly government program that fails to protect families, puts innocent lives at risk, and only causes more anguish.

Please join the Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty in thanking our 15 legislative champions, using this easy action on our website.

Many thanks for all the support you’ve shown during this endeavor. We couldn’t have made it this far without you!

Learn More about the Death Penalty.

EGYPTAIR Is Again Shipping Monkeys to Their Deaths

EGYPTAIR has apparently gone back on its word and has resumed shipping monkeys to their deaths in laboratories, risking the spread of disease and depleting the world of an endangered species, all to make a few quick bucks. We need your help to stop it.

PETA has learned that the airline appears to have recently shipped approximately 500 long-tailed macaques—listed as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature—from the island nation of Mauritius to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, all bound for torment in laboratories. Moreover, they were reportedly shipped from a monkey-breeding company that has been in the midst of an outbreak of tuberculosis, a highly infectious disease that monkeys have transmitted to humans.

This shipment is a blatant violation of EGYPTAIR’s pledge last year announcing that in view of its support of “the vision and mission” of animal protection organizations, it would no longer transport monkeys to laboratories.

Shamefully, that promise ended up proving worthless.

PETA, Action for Primates, One Voice, and Abolición Vivisección have urged EGYPTAIR Holding Company CEO Yehia Zakaria to honor the company’s promise.

But we urgently need you to speak up for monkeys, too.

PETA entities coordinated dozens of actions, and supporters flooded EGYPTAIR with more than 100,000 e-mails and hundreds of telephone calls asking it to stop shipping monkeys to laboratories. It worked until the company’s greed overcame integrity and empathy.

It’s time we did it again. Please TAKE ACTION below!

Original post:

Thanks to the efforts of PETA, other animal protection organizations, and caring people around the globe, nearly every major airline in the world has stopped transporting monkeys to laboratories. Now, it’s time for us to use our collective voices again to let EGYPTAIR know that it has made a very bad business decision by getting involved in the cruel trade in primates for experimentation. We recently received information that 720 long-tailed macaques who’d been torn away from their families in Cambodia were transported to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in New York on April 30, 2022.

photo of monkey in crate

Last year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture cited EGYPTAIR for poor handling and inadequate ventilation and enclosures after a kitten being transported as checked baggage from Cairo to JFK arrived dead. The crate holding the kitten had been covered in solid plastic wrap, preventing airflow. She had not been given any food or water for the 11-hour flight, and her legs, chest, and muzzle were covered with urine. Since March 2022, EGYPTAIR has transported as many as 5,000 macaques to the U.S.—we don’t know whether they all survived and can only imagine the conditions they endured.

Every year, tens of thousands of monkeys are transported to the U.S. to be imprisoned in laboratories and tormented in experiments that consistently fail to lead to meaningful scientific advances. These highly social and sensitive individuals are either captured in nature or bred in captivity on squalid factory farms, where many die from injury and disease even before they’re crammed into small wooden crates and confined to dark, terrifying cargo holds of planes for shipment around the globe.

photo of monkey in crate

The EGYPTAIR flight landed at JFK in the wee hours of the morning. The monkeys would have been traveling on planes for more than 30 hours. The torturous and deadly journey didn’t stop in New York—the no doubt terrified animals were apparently loaded into trucks and driven to quarantine facilities in Texas.

The incentive for airlines to stop shipping monkeys to laboratories is even clearer now, after a truck transporting 100 long-tailed macaques—who had been flown by Kenya Airways from Mauritius to JFK—collided with another vehicle earlier this year. Dozens of wooden crates holding the cold and scared monkeys were thrown from the truck onto a Pennsylvania highway. Several escaped, and authorities confirmed that three were shot dead. Several people who stopped to survey the scene of the accident interacted with the monkeys, and at least one reported symptoms of illness afterward. Given the panoply of pathogens carried by macaques that can be transmitted to humans, it’s clear that the international transport of monkeys is not only a serious ethical issue but also a grave threat to public health and safety—including for passengers and crewmembers on these flights. After PETA contacted Kenya Airways with this information, it committed to stop shipping monkeys from Mauritius to the U.S.

We privately urged EGYPTAIR to follow Kenya Airways’ lead by ending this practice, but so far, the airline has failed to respond to us. We need your help!

Please send polite e-mails to the EGYPTAIR staff below, asking them not to transport monkeys to laboratories or be involved in this cruel industry in any other way. EGYPTAIR should join other airline industry leaders in prohibiting the shipment of primates destined for laboratories.

Ahmed Shaheen
Chair
EGYPTAIR Cargo
cgo.chairman@egyptair.com

Tarek Adawy
Chief Executive, U.S. and Canada
EGYPTAIR
t.adawy@EGYPTAIRnyc.com

EGYPTAIR Cargo Manager, JFK
newyork_ff@egyptair.com

You’re welcome to use the template letter you’ll see when you click on the above e-mail addresses, but putting your subject line and message into your own words will help draw attention to your e-mail.

Please feel free to use our sample letter, but remember that using your own words is always more effective.

Harvard Still Funding Fraudulent Colombian Operation—Even After NIH Defunded It

The fallout from PETA’s 18-month investigation into the Caucaseco Scientific Research Center, the fraudulent Colombian organization that ran hellholes funded by U.S. taxpayer money, has been sweeping. Its monkey facility was shuttered, and the animals were rescued. They’re now recovering under the care of environmental authorities. What’s more, Colombian officials found Caucaseco’s human trials to be fraudulent. Legislation aimed at preventing this sort of disaster is currently being debated in the U.S., and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has finally yanked the Colombian operation’s funding.

But the more we dig, the more we find.

Two aotus monkeys sit in a filthy cage on top of a corrugated pipe

PETA discovered that Harvard University is among Caucaseco’s financial backers. The university has had every opportunity to distance itself publicly from the sham operation, but it has declined to respond—even after NIH pulled Caucaseco’s funding.

Here’s What We Know

Caucaseco is a recipient of Harvard grant money.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, a national charitable organization, awarded a grant to the university’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, which then turned over part of that money to Caucaseco. Gates Foundation officials have confirmed to PETA that as of May 31, the Colombian operation was a recipient of money awarded to Harvard.

There’s More

In August 2022, while monkeys were dying at the Primate Center Foundation—Caucaseco’s affiliated monkey facility—a Harvard professor attended a seminar there, just a few feet from the suffering caged animals.

PETA has kept officials at the T.H. Chan School informed of the latest Caucaseco developments and the investigations by Colombian authorities against Sócrates Herrera Valencia and Myriam Arévalo Ramírez, the married couple at the helm of the organization.

We’ve asked Harvard officials to distance the university from this sham organization, but they’ve remained silent.

Harvard Parallels Caucaseco’s Animal Abuse

Interestingly, Harvard is also home to another monkey experimenter on PETA’s radar: Margaret Livingstone, who has sewn baby monkeys’ eyelids shut and left the animals in complete darkness for up to a year in gruesome sensory deprivation experiments.

Harvard is also silent about her.

What You Can Do

Please TAKE ACTION today and urge your U.S. representative to support the Cease Animal Research Grants Overseas (CARGO) Act, which aims to end public funding of all foreign animal laboratories so that no U.S. taxpayer dollars are ever again sent overseas for pointless animal experiments.

Then URGE HARVARD to finally cancel Livingstone’s abominable cruelty. 

Take Action against all forms of cruelty to animals and wildlife and learn more about alternatives to testing on animals and wildlife. Learn more about the reasons why testing on animals and wildlife is not needed!

Tell Travel Companies to Cut the Bullsh*t and Stop Promoting Bull Torture!

The Running of the Bulls is held every July at the annual festival of San Fermín in Pamplona, Spain. It’s a horrific bloodbath in which at least 48 bulls are tortured and killed, and it must end. But travel companies Iberian Traveler, TGW Travel Group, Bucket List Events, Fanatics, and Palace Tours seem to think it’s OK to promote this barbaric event by selling tickets to it.

During this event, bulls are deliberately terrified and chased down cobblestone streets. They’re hit by people, they fall, they smash into walls, and later they’re forced into the bullfighting ring and violently killed.

Bulls have unique personalities and form complex social bonds with each other. The Running of the Bulls causes them extreme suffering, and they never make it out alive.

Please take these important steps to politely urge these travel companies to stop selling tickets for and otherwise promoting the Running of the Bulls.

Text BULL to 73822 to tell travel companies to stop promoting bull torture. Then post this image on social media to encourage your friends and family to text, too:

Text BULL to 73822 to tell travel companies to stop promoting The Running of the Bulls.

Contact Iberian Traveler using its contact form.

CONTACT IBERIAN TRAVELER
Comment on TGW Travel Group’s Facebook and Instagram pages.

COMMENT ON TGW’S INSTAGRAM PAGE

Chat with Bucket List Events using the chatbot in the lower right corner of its website

CHAT WITH BUCKET LIST EVENTS
Comment on Fanatics’ Facebook and Instagram pages.

COMMENT ON FANATICS’ INSTAGRAM PAGE
Call Palace Tours at 1-800-724-5120. Here are some talking points you can use:

Please stop selling tickets to the Running of the Bulls. At least 48 bulls are tormented and killed during the event every year. It’s a barbaric bloodbath that must end.

Bulls are sentient beings with unique personalities who form complex social bonds, just like dogs. The Running of the Bulls causes them extreme suffering, and they never make it out alive. If you wouldn’t promote an event that kills at least 48 dogs every year, why do you promote an event that kills bulls?

CALL PALACE TOURS
Take Action against all forms of cruelty to animals and wildlife!

Once her former owners agreed to relinquish her, we wasted no time spiriting Ada away to our headquarters and gave her a nice long bath and a brand-new haircut. She quickly found the perfect home with PETA staffer Hollie Wood.

As the video shows, Ada quickly formed an unbreakable bond with Hollie’s daughter, Eliot, and now the two best friends are inseparable. Ada’s always first in the car when it’s time to pick her human sister up from school—she can’t wait to see her again—and while she may technically count as a senior dog, she happily matches Eliot’s youthful energy. Now, Ada’s much too preoccupied with school runs, play time, walks, and cuddles to give a thought to her decade of deprivation—and Eliot wouldn’t have it any other way.

Dogs Like Ada Suffer Every Day—Here’s How You Can Help Them

For 10 years, PETA fieldworkers showed up for Ada to make her life spent chained in a backyard as good and safe as we possibly could. And while Ada is now finally inside a home with people who love and respect her, thousands of dogs are still stuck outside all year round, forced to suffer through scorching heat in the summer and devastating cold in the winter.

You can help “backyard dogs” by sponsoring a PETA doghouse today. Another effective way to help them all year long is to work with elected representatives to pass ordinances that ban or restrict chaining. To get started, see what current legislation on tethering dogs your community has.

white and black dog chained to plastic house

Dogs should never be left outside unattended, but when they’re outside and deprived of access to water or shelter, the situation is an emergency and local authorities should be contacted immediately. If they’re unresponsive, contact PETA for help. Their well-being, if not their life, could depend on your taking action.

If you see a chained dog in your area whose situation is not an emergency, read PETA’s tips to help chained dogs

Track and Follow All Rescues!

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Spokane City Council members respond to allegations of

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(The Center Square) – Two members of the Spokane City Council, Michael Cathcart and Karen Stratton, responded Friday to constituent concerns about unethical treatment at Spokane County Regional Animal Protective Services, or SCRAPS.

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Bell County Commonwealth Attorney to seek death penalty in

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Bell County Commonwealth Attorney to seek death penalty in toddler’s death

Published 11:06 am Friday, September 8, 2023

STAFF REPORT

The Bell County Commonwealth Attorney will seek the death penalty against Erica Lawson in the death of her child. Lawson was charged last month in the death of her daughter, 17-month-old Elena Hembree.

On Tuesday, Lisa Fugate of the Commonwealth Attorney’s office filed a Notice of Aggravating Circumstance in the case stating that the Commonwealth “for the purpose of notifying the Defendant that it intends to present evidence regarding an aggravating circumstance, pursuant to KRS 532.025 (2)(a)(9), that being that the offense of murder was intentional and resulted in the death of a seventeen month old toddler. Therefore, the Commonwealth intends to see, the imposition of the death penalty.”

On July 28, Hembree was taken to the Middlesboro ARH Hospital after being beaten and raped, according to police. The child arrived was transported to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital in Knoxville, where she died two days later.

Lawson was initially arrested in early August and charged with manslaughter, failure to report child abuse, criminal abuse, child under 12, and wanton endangerment. She was arraigned on Aug. 22, and charges were amended to include first degree murder.

Lawson is being held on a $1 million dollar cash bond in the Leslie County Detention Center.

There have been no further arrests made, and DNA test results are still pending from the laboratory for multiple submissions related to potential involvement in the case.

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Dolphin research team returns from latest mission

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RIVIERA BEACH, Fla. — Dolphins are typically thought of as friendly, smart, and interesting mammals, but WPTV is learning from a locally-based research team there is much more to gain from studying dolphins.

The research team with the Wild Dolphin Project recently returned from their latest mission in the Bahamas. They, in part, studied how migrant dolphins are mixing with resident pods.

“Because you can see under the water in the Bahamas, we look at their communication and try to crack their code to see if they have a language,” said Dr. Denise Herzing, who founded the Wild Dolphin Project in the 80s in the West Palm Beach area.

As Herzing explained, the team observed typical social behaviors for dolphins, possibly indicating migrant dolphins are having continued success in co-existing with resident pods.

Florida Atlantic University student Hayley Knapp had several eye-opening moments during the mission.

“We were motoring around looking for dolphins and I was like – hey, there’s a piece of trash, and there. It was everywhere, like something had dumped a bunch of trash in the ocean,” Knapp said.

“Dolphins are top predators, and they’re a really good indication of the health of oceans,” said Cindy Elliser, founder of Pacific Mammal Research. “So, if we know the pod of dolphins in South Florida isn’t doing well, there might be something happening in the environment we need to take care of.”

“It matters that we learn to re-love things in the ocean and find strategies to mitigate what we’ve done,” Herzing said.



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A step closer to protecting endangered wildlife

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10-year feral cat plan brings us a step closer to properly protecting endangered wildlife
A burrowing bettong in the cat-free fenced area of Newhaven Wildlife Sanctuary where it has been reintroduced. Cats drove this species to extinction on the mainland. Credit: Brad Leue/Australian Wildlife Conservancy, CC BY

Federal Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek has released a draft feral cat management plan.

Its aim is to reduce the devastating impact of cats on Australian wildlife, with a focus on protecting the most at-risk species from extinction.

Cats kill over 6 million native animals in Australia each day, and are challenging to manage.

The plan released for public consultation has a ten-year horizon with an estimated cost of A$60 million in the first five years. It could be a major step towards achieving Australia’s global commitments to end extinctions.

Why manage cats?

Unless we control the impact of cats, many native wildlife populations will continue to decline. Some will be driven to extinction, a sad and irreversible outcome for future generations and the ecosystems these species are part of.

Cats are versatile and highly effective predators. A large male cat can kill animals up to about 4kg—nearly as big as the cat itself.

Since they arrived in Australia with Europeans, cats have spread across 99% of the country. Only some islands and specially constructed fenced conservation areas are cat-free.

Many native animal populations can’t cope with sustained hunting pressure from cats. Impacted species include more than 200 of Australia’s nationally listed threatened species and 37 migratory species.

One in 10 of the mammal species present when cats arrived are now extinct. Cats played a major role in most of those 34 extinctions. And they continue to drive population declines and regional extinctions of susceptible species.

Cats also carry and spread a range of diseases. One of these, toxoplasmosis, can cause sickness, behavioral impairment and death in other mammals and birds. This disease, which is entirely dependent on cats, can also have serious consequences for livestock and human health.

A strategic response

The government’s new Threat Abatement Plan aims to co-ordinate national efforts to reduce the impacts of feral cats on native wildlife. It follows extensive consultation with Indigenous ranger groups and First Nations organizations around the country, with members of the national Feral Cat Taskforce, and with threatened species and cat management experts.

Since cats occur just about everywhere, affect so many species and are elusive and hard to control, the plan is strategic: it prioritizes the places and species for which controlling cats will have the greatest benefits.

Some significant successes have been achieved over the past decade or so, and the plan builds on those.

What are the priorities?

The plan’s objective is to improve outcomes for threatened and cat-susceptible native species, including numbats, bettongs, bandicoots and island-nesting seabirds.

Building from recent successes, it includes priorities for eradicating cats from islands and from within fenced conservation areas, because cats cannot quickly recolonise these areas. These projects are critical for native species, such as stick-nest rats and mala (rufous hare-wallaby), that can’t persist even with a very low density of cats.

The plan also prioritizes ongoing cat control in areas with important populations of threatened species that are highly vulnerable to cats, but which can persist as long as cat numbers are kept low.

This approach is valuable for species such as rock wallabies, which live in relatively small, well-defined areas, and for mammals of south-west Australia, which can be protected from cats and foxes by annual poison baiting.

Improving habitat management can also help reduce cat impacts across very large areas. For example, improving habitat in northern Australian tropical savannas, through better management of fire and livestock, can reduce cat impacts and increase native mammal populations. Cats hunt most efficiently in sparsely vegetated areas, so better cover provides more shelter for native wildlife.

In southern Australia, reducing rabbit populations also reduces cat numbers by removing an easy food source. This then relieves some of the predation pressure on native animals.

What else is in the plan?

The plan proposes reforms of laws and regulations for pet and feral cats in all states and territories. For example, the plan includes actions to make laws on pet cat management more consistent across the country and to encourage responsible pet ownership. This means desexing cats and keeping cats contained so they can’t harm wildlife or produce kittens that end up as feral cats.

Many of Australia’s last strongholds for threatened species that are vulnerable to cats, such as great desert skinks, bilbies and night parrots, are in Indigenous Protected Areas and other Indigenous-managed land. The plan outlines practical support that Indigenous rangers want to help them manage cats.

Over the past few decades, we have learned much about the impacts of cats and how best to manage them. But we are still a long way from cost-effective, continent-scale solutions to protect native wildlife. The plan identifies the need for new applied research and the development and testing of effective control tools.

Who’s responsible?

Success will depend on focusing and enhancing the already significant efforts of governments, Indigenous and non-Indigenous land managers, environmental non-government organizations, industry, community groups, researchers and the public.

The Australian government will help to deliver the plan by coordinating actions and making strategic investments in management and research activity.

Be part of the solution

Every Australian who cares about our unique wildlife has an interest in cat management.

Cat owners can help by desexing their pet and keeping it indoors or in a cat run at all times.

Landowners can help by removing refuse that helps support feral cat colonies and by managing habitat so native animals can thrive.

And make sure your local, state and federal government members know how much you care about native wildlife.

The plan is available for public comment until December 11. Have a look, and have your say.

Provided by
The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.The Conversation

Citation:
Australian 10-year feral cat plan: A step closer to protecting endangered wildlife (2023, September 9)
retrieved 9 September 2023
from https://phys.org/news/2023-09-australian-year-feral-cat-closer.html

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Urban Outfitters’ Leather Sales to Elicit a Black Sludge

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For Immediate Release:
September 8, 2023

Contact:
Nicole Perreira 202-483-7382

Miami – PETA supporters brandishing buckets proclaiming, “Leather Is a Dirty Business,” will gather outside the Urban Outfitters store in the Lincoln Road Shopping District on Tuesday and dump black sludge all over themselves to represent the environmental devastation caused by the leather industry. The action is part of PETA’s campaign calling on all Urban Outfitters Inc. brands to stop selling animal-derived materials—including leather.

When:    Tuesday, September 12, 12 noon

Where:    819 Lincoln Rd. (at the intersection with Jefferson Avenue), Miami

Urban Outfitters’ Leather Sales Elicit PETA Black Sludge Dump

PETA supporters cover themselves in black sludge outside an Urban Outfitters store. Photo: PETA

“Cows and calves lead short, miserable lives for leather bags and shoes, which require enormous amounts of energy and dangerous chemicals to produce,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “PETA urges Urban Outfitters to cater to the growing demand from millennials and Gen Z for sustainable vegan materials that are kind to the planet and leave animals in peace.”

Cows used for leather are castrated and branded and their tails are cut off—all without painkillers—before they’re violently killed. Leather production also destroys the planet: Animal agriculture, which includes the leather industry, is responsible for nearly one-fifth of all human-induced greenhouse gas emissions, and turning skin into leather requires significant energy and dangerous chemicals, including formaldehyde, coal-tar derivatives, and cyanide-based oils, dyes, and finishes. Sustainable vegan leather can be made from prickly pear cactus, mushrooms, apples, pineapples, and other innovative materials.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear”—opposes speciesism, a human-supremacist worldview.

For more information, please visit PETA.org, listen to The PETA Podcast, or follow the group on X (formerly Twitter), Facebook, or Instagram.



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Declaración de WWF en relación al canje de deuda para

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  • Fecha
    07 septiembre 2023
  • Contacto para medios

Hoy, los gobiernos de Estados Unidos y Perú anunciaron un canje de deuda que permite el acceso a nuevos financiamientos para proteger la Amazonía peruana, la cual cubre el 60% del país. El acuerdo es parte del innovador “canje de deuda por naturaleza” iniciado en la década de 1980 por el fallecido Tom Lovejoy, el primer científico jefe de World Wildlife Fund (WWF). En relación a lo anterior, WWF-US emitió la siguiente declaración de su presidente y CEO, Carter Roberts:

“La prosperidad de la Amazonía es sumamente importante para la salud de nuestro planeta y de quienes lo llaman hogar. Es uno de los lugares con mayor biodiversidad en la Tierra y confina entre 150 y 200 mil millones de toneladas de carbono. Pero para Perú y otros países amazónicos, el financiamiento para la conservación de la selva tropical y otros ecosistemas críticos es un gran desafío. Acuerdos como este ofrecen una solución para poder continuar avanzando”

“Este acuerdo otorgará fondos para ayudar a mejorar la efectividad de las áreas protegidas en Perú. También contribuirá a los medios de subsistencia de los pueblos indígenas y las comunidades locales en la Amazonía peruana y sus alrededores, y reforzará el Patrimonio Natural del Perú, que apoya la conservación de unos 16 millones de hectáreas a través del innovador enfoque de los Proyectos de Financiamiento para la Permanencia (PFP). WWF agradece a la administración Biden por su liderazgo para finalizar el acuerdo y al Congreso de Estados Unidos por el continuo apoyo bipartidista a esta iniciativa. Esperamos trabajar con el gobierno de Perú y los socios de conservación para asegurar un futuro lleno de vida para la Amazonía peruana”.

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